Black on White

Each new day brings a reason to create and laugh, waking to new things.

Faced with the challenge of a blank page, three creatives were invited to embody their work for a collection of rugs. A graphic and industrial designer, a painter, and a writer and gallery owner are the people behind the exclusive “Black on White” collection that showcases personal visions of contemporary rug design.

The three rugs: Estambul, Limbo & Manuscrit share a common bond, the absence of colour. The combination of black and white intensifies the identity of each piece. Each rug is a dichotomy, a horizontal canvas. A masterpiece under your feet.

Javier Mariscal

Marked by his “creative incontinence”, Mariscal has been expressing his sensibilities through a variety of disciplines, artistic or otherwise.

Born in Valencia, Mariscal has developed his professional career in Barcelona. The Mediterranean culture of both cities is revealed in his work: the hedonism, optimism and symbolism, as well as the vibrant range of colours and his poetic approach. Before dealing with projects from a multidisciplinary point of view became a recognised value, his professional activity of moving from one discipline to another, thanks to his untiring curiosity and his passion to innovate, contributes to make everyday life more interesting, easy and friendly. From furniture design to painting, sculpture, and illustration, interior and graphic design, animation, landscaping, among many others, all have been the treated with his unique professional and personal vision.

Mariscal expresses himself using a personal language that is complex in intention, yet simple in manifestation, innocent yet at the same time provocative, enabling him to innovate, take risks and communicate, to keep ‘tickling’ the eyes of those who see his work and create complicity with others.

www.mariscal.com

Black on White Estambul

Size guide

's models

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Hand tufted

This technique requires a pistol-like tool to punch the fiber strands into a previously stretched fabric in a frame.

  1. To start the process, the strands are punched into the areas marked by the mapping (a template used to transfer the digital design to the rug support).

  2. Next, the protruding strands are cut and shaved to achieve the desired pile height.

  3. The design is contoured with scissors or a needle in order to correctly define the different areas of the motif.

  4. Once the motif is defined, a layer of latex is applied to the reverse side of the rug to ensure that the strands remain attached to the structure.

  5. To finish, a layer of fabric is affixed to act as a lining, offering a quality finish.

This technique permits curvilinear shapes, different pile heights, as well as the application of different colors within the same rug.

High density and durability.