Black on White

Each new day brings a reason to create and laugh, waking to new things.

Faced with the challenge of a blank page, three creatives were invited to embody their work for a collection of rugs. A graphic and industrial designer, a painter, and a writer and gallery owner are the people behind the exclusive “Black on White” collection that showcases personal visions of contemporary rug design.

The three rugs: Estambul, Limbo & Manuscrit share a common bond, the absence of colour. The combination of black and white intensifies the identity of each piece. Each rug is a dichotomy, a horizontal canvas. A masterpiece under your feet.

Xano Armenter

Born in Las Palmas in a Catalan family, Armenter studied graphic design and art at the Escola Eina in Barcelona. The artist looks to Catalan informalism, emergent local conceptualism and pop for inspiration.

In 1980, Armenter moved to New York, to study at the School of Visual Arts with Milton Glaser (1981), and at the New York Academy (1982). Living in the East Village, he was curious about the influence of “pattern painting”, an ephemeral movement with a high impact on the urban scene of the legendary city, where graffiti and a new generation of artists proposed an early return to painting.

During the ‘90s, and a subsequent move to Los Angeles, his work takes on a colourful abstraction while experimenting with figurative representations. Barcelona is now his home, and his work can be found in collections around the world.

Black on White Limbo

's models

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Hand tufted

This technique requires a pistol-like tool to punch the fiber strands into a previously stretched fabric in a frame.

  1. To start the process, the strands are punched into the areas marked by the mapping (a template used to transfer the digital design to the rug support).

  2. Next, the protruding strands are cut and shaved to achieve the desired pile height.

  3. The design is contoured with scissors or a needle in order to correctly define the different areas of the motif.

  4. Once the motif is defined, a layer of latex is applied to the reverse side of the rug to ensure that the strands remain attached to the structure.

  5. To finish, a layer of fabric is affixed to act as a lining, offering a quality finish.

This technique permits curvilinear shapes, different pile heights, as well as the application of different colors within the same rug.

High density and durability.