Cuadros 1996

A nanimarquina classic. A patchwork of twenty colours, a decorative melody.

During one of the many visits to India, while observing a sample of wool fibres grouped by colour tones, Nani Marquina envisioned the embryo of one of the brand’s most emblematic designs.

Twenty colours form a magic checkerboard of vibrant colours that create a rhythmic sensation of movement. This design, born from a seemingly random combination of shades, actually follows a very specific linear sequence.

Nani Marquina

True to her design roots, Nani Marquina launched her namesake brand in 1987, a time in which contemporary rugs were non-existent in Spain.

After studying industrial design at the Escuela Massana of Barcelona and enjoying the success of her first bespoke textile designs, Nani launched nanimarquina, a brand dedicated to the design, creation, and distribution of rugs and textile products for the home, based on values such as observation, innovation, and enthusiasm, with the goal to use traditional craftsmanship and techniques to create contemporary pieces.

In 1993, Nani Marquina embarked on a daring business venture: she moved manufacturing facilities to the north of India. The further incorporation of craftsmanship and tradition as a new design concept marked a clear difference, consolidating the brand.

Throughout the years, the brand has garnered numerous awards such as the National Design Award and the Premi Cambra a la Gestió Empresarial (Chamber Award for Design Management) in 2005, as well as several nominations for the Príncipe Felipe Award for Company Excellence. Nani Marquina has also recently received the International Women’s Entrepreneurial Challenge Award from the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, a personal achievement that led to the 2007 FIDEM Award for Entrepreneurial Woman of the Year. She has enjoyed tenure as the Chairwoman of ADP (Professional Design Association), and of Red (Reunión Empresas de Diseño). Starting in 2014, Nani Marquina is the President of the FAD, (Foment de les Arts i Disseny), in Barcelona.

Cuadros 1996 1

nani logo

Hand tufted

This technique requires a pistol-like tool to punch the fiber strands into a previously stretched fabric in a frame.

  1. To start the process, the strands are punched into the areas marked by the mapping (a template used to transfer the digital design to the rug support).

  2. Next, the protruding strands are cut and shaved to achieve the desired pile height.

  3. The design is contoured with scissors or a needle in order to correctly define the different areas of the motif.

  4. Once the motif is defined, a layer of latex is applied to the reverse side of the rug to ensure that the strands remain attached to the structure.

  5. To finish, a layer of fabric is affixed to act as a lining, offering a quality finish.

This technique permits curvilinear shapes, different pile heights, as well as the application of different colors within the same rug.

High density and durability.