Lattice

The Lattice collection springs from the organic imagination of the Bouroullec brothers.
The basic pattern, rhythmically reproduced, gives rise to a harmonic succession of colours.
Balance, proportion and irregularity are the key elements in the controlled disorder that transforms Lattice into a unique creation.

“Rugs are commonly designed as a surface on which a pattern is distributed. However in the case of Lattice, the pattern is defined as a constructive system to generate the form of the rug itself. The system of coloured bands, in which pattern, form and colour are linked in an intimate manner, creates a different scope.” – the Bouroullec.

Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec

Ronan (born 1971, Quimper) and Erwan Bouroullec (born 1976, Quimper) are brothers and designers based in Paris. They have been working together for about fifteen years bonded by diligence and challenged by their distinct personalities with the intention to reach more balance and finesse.

Their work has covered many fields ranging from the design of small objects as jewelry to spatial arrangements and architecture, from craftsmanship to industrial scale, from drawings to videos and photography.

They have collaborated with leading design companies such as Alessi, Artek, Axor Hansgrohe Cappellini, Established & Sons, Glas Italia, Flos, Hay, Iittala, kreo gallery, Kvadrat, Kartell, Kettal, Ligne Roset, Magis, nanimarquina, Mattiazzi, Mutina, Samsung, Swarovski and Vitra.

Their studio is based in Paris and their team numbers around eight people.

Lattice 1

's models

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Hand loomed

A precise manual weaving technique, involving vertical or horizontal looms, carried out by highly skilled artisans. The basic concept of weaving is to intersect the longitudinal threads, (the warp), with the transverse threads, (the weft). The yarn is stretched and fastened to the loom to create a taut warp. Working from bottom to top, the artisans weave the weft, creating the different patterns and textures. To create the pile, the fibre is wrapped around a special rod during the weaving process and then cut to ensure equal height.

This technique permits a wide range of finishes, from simple and delicate short-strand pile, shag rugs to more elaborate loop pile involving various fibres. The handloom technique is also used to create dhurries, a flat weave with no pile that is perfect as a base for our volumetric rugs.