Milton Glaser

“A study of colours, shadows and textures to achieve the perfect balance, expressing Milton Glaser’s aesthetics: sensations, perceptions and the discovery of Shakespeare in a rug.” Nani Marquina.

The result of an accidental encounter between Shakespeare, Africa and Nani Marquina, the Milton Glaser collection is based on his belief that all things are ultimately connected and the role of the artist is to discover the inevitable relationship between everything.
This search for answers is sometimes difficult and at other times, a piece of cake.

Milton Glaser

Original from New York, Milton Glaser (129 - 2020 NYC) is among the most celebrated graphic designers in the world. A prolific illustrator and designer, he is renowned for his CD and book designs, posters and logos, including the iconic I (heart) NY.

As a Fulbright scholar, Glaser studied with the painter, Giorgio Morandi in Bologna. He co-founded the revolutionary Push Pin Studios in 1954 and the New York Magazine in 1968. In 1974, he launched Milton Glaser, Inc. where he continues to produce prodigious amount of work.

In 2009, he was the first graphic designer to receive the National Medal of the Arts award, and has enjoyed solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris. Honoured with lifetime achievement awards from the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum (2004) and the Fulbright Association (2011), Glaser is an articulate spokesman for ethical design practises.

www.miltonglaser.com

Milton Glaser African Pattern 3

's models

nani logo

Hand tufted

This technique requires a pistol-like tool to punch the fiber strands into a previously stretched fabric in a frame.

  1. To start the process, the strands are punched into the areas marked by the mapping (a template used to transfer the digital design to the rug support).

  2. Next, the protruding strands are cut and shaved to achieve the desired pile height.

  3. The design is contoured with scissors or a needle in order to correctly define the different areas of the motif.

  4. Once the motif is defined, a layer of latex is applied to the reverse side of the rug to ensure that the strands remain attached to the structure.

  5. To finish, a layer of fabric is affixed to act as a lining, offering a quality finish.

This technique permits curvilinear shapes, different pile heights, as well as the application of different colors within the same rug.

High density and durability.