Rabari

The Rabari collection is created with 100% New Zealand wool, handmade in India with hand-knotted and hand-woven Sumak techniques.

Comprised of two different rugs, the Rabari collection offers exceptional beauty through the outstanding design by Doshi Levien, a refined combination of patterns with a unique graphic sensuality.

“We decided to create a series of rugs that evoke the sensual and shiny world of tribal folk embroidery of India. We wanted our collection for nanimarquina to reference the unfinished embroideries like studies of different techniques in progress, as they gradually emerge over time. The spontaneous compositions of the rugs embody the serendipity and freedom to improvise inherent in each step of a handmade piece. Joyful, irreverent and unique.” Doshi Levien

Nipa Doshi + Jonathan Levien

Doshi Levien is a London-based design office, established in 2000 by Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien. Working in tandem to create their own set of design rules, the duo aim to extract a deep richness from each idea and concept.

Doshi Levien’s work celebrates the hybrid and explores the blend of cultures, technology, storytelling, industrial design, and fine craftsmanship through a variety of disciplines and industries. Nipa’s refined and astute visual direction combines with Jonathan’s precision and his tenacity as an industrial designer.

www.doshilevien.com

Rabari 1

's models

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Hand knotted

Manual weaving produced on a vertical loom in which the strands are tightly fastened to the warp by knots.
The shape and thickness of the knot differentiate the variety of hand-knotted rugs and the finish will result in a 'Cut Pile', 'Loop Pile' or a braid-style in the case of Sumak rugs.

The number of knots will directly affect the density, definition of the pattern, durability and value of the rug.

Persian knot

This is a hand-knotting technique, in which half the knot is wound around the warp, while the other half is left loose. The result is an asymmetric knot that can lead to high densities and truly detailed motifs.

Turkish knot

This is also a hand-knotting technique, but unlike the Persian knot, consisting in tightly symmetrical knots that achieve consistent pile and is used for thick rugs.

Indo Nepal knot

To create this type of knot, the craftsman winds the fiber around a rod, working more quickly. The fiber is subsequently cut and the cut pile or loop pile is obtained.

Sumak

A technique in which the strands are fastened to the warp, which makes the rug seem to be constructed of braids. In this manner, a flat structure with surface relief is obtained.

Hand loomed

A precise manual weaving technique, involving vertical or horizontal looms, carried out by highly skilled artisans. The basic concept of weaving is to intersect the longitudinal threads, (the warp), with the transverse threads, (the weft). The yarn is stretched and fastened to the loom to create a taut warp. Working from bottom to top, the artisans weave the weft, creating the different patterns and textures. To create the pile, the fibre is wrapped around a special rod during the weaving process and then cut to ensure equal height.

This technique permits a wide range of finishes, from simple and delicate short-strand pile, shag rugs to more elaborate loop pile involving various fibres. The handloom technique is also used to create dhurries, a flat weave with no pile that is perfect as a base for our volumetric rugs.