Telares

This collection is born from the persistent search for new approaches that the loom has to offer.

By combining the techniques used in kilims and typical dhurries, we have created a unique set of textures and rhythm through the variation and pressure of the fibers. The changes in the pattern, which are born from the tension applied between weft and warp, give the rug an appearance full of nuances, thus evoking the most primary manual work: the insistent trial and error process of the craftsman from which magical results arise.

Telares has required a lot of groundwork and prototyping to find the desired texture. The result is a looser kilim of curved shapes, unlike traditional kilims that are usually geometric and rectilinear. It is hand-woven with Afghan wool. Its rustic appearance and the irregularities of the wool result in a unique rug where you can appreciate the beauty and authenticity of craftsmanship. Its curly fringes are noteworthy. Available in 5 colors, each model seeks a range of contrasts with the combination the characteristic natural color of the Afghan wool and a contrasted color.

Nanimarquina team

A group of product designers that, in addition to coordinating the relationship with external artists, develop their own collections as a result of the investigation into the possibilities offered by artisanal techniques.

A clear example of the personality of this team is the Telares collection, an ode to handcrafted work. Telares showcases the beauty of artisan imperfection, playing with variations in weft and warp pressure.

Elisa Padrón (Head of design) and Clara Navarro (Product designer) are the current members of our design team.

Telares Carmine

's models

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Hand loomed

A precise manual weaving technique, involving vertical or horizontal looms, carried out by highly skilled artisans. The basic concept of weaving is to intersect the longitudinal threads, (the warp), with the transverse threads, (the weft). The yarn is stretched and fastened to the loom to create a taut warp. Working from bottom to top, the artisans weave the weft, creating the different patterns and textures. To create the pile, the fibre is wrapped around a special rod during the weaving process and then cut to ensure equal height.

This technique permits a wide range of finishes, from simple and delicate short-strand pile, shag rugs to more elaborate loop pile involving various fibres. The handloom technique is also used to create dhurries, a flat weave with no pile that is perfect as a base for our volumetric rugs.